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FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Vol. 34 March 8, 1937 No. 



LATE CABLES... 

London wool sales continuing on March 5 with gen- 
eral tone of market excellent. Compared with closing of 
preceding series on January 27, greasy merinos were 2.5 
to 5 percent higher and scoured merinos on a par. Fine, 
medium, and low greasy crossbreds were at par, with all 
types of scoured crossbreds at par to 5 percent higher. 
All slipes were fully at par. Yorkshire bidders were 
the chief buyers with continental buyers taking nearly 
all Punta Arenas and also moderately active in bids for 
merinos and faulty crossbreds, American buyers still 
quiet. (Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor, London.) 



124 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Yol. 34, Ho. 10 



GHAIInTS 

Vi/heat acreage - It al y and I ndia 

Winter sowings for the 1937 wheat crop of Italy are estimated at 
12,598,000 acres, according to a cable from the International Institute 
of Agriculture at Rome. This is an increase of 1.4 percent over the 
winter acreage sown fcr the 1936 crop and is about 4 percent above the 
average for 1931-1935. The second estimate of the wheat acreage in the 
Funjab, India, is placed at 10,799,000 acres, which is a slight increase 
over the January estimate and compared with the second estimate last 
season of 10,236,000 acres and the final figure of 10,569,000 acres. 

The first official estimate of the 1936 wheat crop of Italy is 
reported by the International Institute of Agriculture at 224,281,000 
"bushels. This compares with 282,758,000 bushels produced in 1935 and 
is 11 percent under the average of 1930-1934. The 1936 rye crop amounted 
to 5,197,000 bushels as against 6,267,000 bushels produced in 1936 and 
the average for 1930-1934 of 6,261,000 bushels. 

Argentine crop conditions 

Lack of rainfall and relatively high temperatures have definitely 
reduced the 1936-37 Argentine corn prospects in those areas outside of 
the main corn zone, according to the February report of the Ministry of 
Agriculture. In the main corn-producing regions, however, crop condi- 
tions continue to be satisfactory. The total outturn is unofficially 
estimated at 362,184,000 bushels by Agricultural Attache p. 0. Nyhus at 
Buenos Aires, which compares with 392,483,000 bushels harvested in 
1935-36. The rain received in February, covering the northern part of 
the Province of Buenos Aires, the southern part of Santa Fe , and south- 
eastern sections of Cordoba, was of direct benefit to the crop. Good 
yields are therefore expected from an area comprising about 45 percent 
of the total corn zone, which generally accounts for approximately 70 
percent of the total corn production. 

The threshing of small grains proceeded actively during the dry 
weather and was almost completed by the middle of February. Only a 
small quantity of flaxseed was still stacked in the southern part of 
the Province of Buenos Aires. 

Czechoslovakia becomes an exporter of wheat 

Although a net importer of wheat for many years, Czechoslovakia 
became a net exporter of wheat during 1936. Under the stimulus of 
high prices paid to producers by the Grain Monopoly, wheat production 
in Czechoslovakia increased during the past few years in spite of at- 
tempts on the part of the Government to discourage the acreage sown to 
bread grains. Stocks became burdensome, but with world wheat prices 



March 8, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



125 



approaching prices guaranteed "by the Monopoly, it recently "became profit- 
able to dispose of excess supplies through exportation. Shipments, start- 
ing rather late in 1S36, totaled more than 1,200,000 "bushels for the year 
as compared with less than 6,000 "bushels exported in 1935. 

Reports indicate that exports from Czechoslovakia will continue 
during 1937. If world prices remain high, shipments may greatly ex- 
ceed those of 1936. It is also possible that sowings for the new 
wheat crop may be increased. The area sown to winter wheat for harvest 
in 1937 was estimated at 1,969,000 acres, a decline of 11 percent from 
that of the previous year, but an expansion in the spring acreage might 
be great enough to increase the total wheat area over that of 1936. 

British malting barley requirements large r 

British brewers appear to require about 670,000 short tons of 
malting barley for the operations of the year ending September 30, 1937, 
as reported by Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor at London. In 1935-36. 
646,000 tons were used, against 541,000 tons in 1932-33. It is assumed 
that the 1936-37 requirements will be filled by domestic barley to the 
extent of about 465,000 tons, necessitating the use of 205,000 tons of 
imported barley. The indicated use of foreign barley for this year 
represents an increase of 4 percent over the corresponding 1935-36 
utilization. If supplies of California barley are 145,000 tons or less, 
Chile and other countries will be called upon to supply 60,000 tons or 
more . 

Supplies of foreign malting barley have become unusually scarce 
in Great Britain in recent weeks. Imports from California have been 
light, and the relatively heavy imports of Chilean barley have been 
insufficient to maintain total foreign supplies. Unless larger sup- 
plies are forthcoming, it is expected that imports of new-crop Southern 
Hemisphere barley this spring will be heavy. Depletion of brewers' 
stocks is seen as the basis for an active demand next summer for Cali- 
fornia and other Northern Hemisphere barleys. 

British barley has been moving to market somewhat more rapidly 
than usual, and prices have been well maintained, despite brewers' 
complaints of inferior quality. It is expected that brewers' pur- 
chases of home-grown barley will represent a larger share of their 
requirements than in other recent years, when domestic barley repre- 
sented 68 to 70 percent of the total purchases. The unusually high 
prices of California barley have been a factor sustaining domestic pur- 
chases. It is stated, however, that actual availability of supplies, 
rather than relative prices of foreign and domestic barley, is the 
chief consideration governing brewers' purchases. 



126 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, No. 10 



' COTTON 

European cotton textile situation favorable 

European cotton textile developments in January maintained, on 
the whole, the favorable trend which has characterized the situation 
for several months, according to L. V. Steere, Agricultural Attache at 
Berlin. Mill activity rose further in a number of countries, domestic 
wholesale and retail demand for cotton textiles remained high, and ex- 
ports were generally sustained, even showing gains in several countries. 
As a result, mill consumption of raw cotton developed favorably and spin- 
ners, stimulated also by a firmly rising market, bought an appreciable 
volume of raw material. Consumption of American cotton, however, is in- 
dicated in some quarters not to be keeping pace with the general rate 
of expansion, and American growths are said to have been somewhat neg- 
lected in spinner purchases. This is at least partly a result of price 
relationships favoring competitive types of cotton. 

The European cotton textile picture is now more generally fa- 
vorable than it has been for a long time; in fact, there is nothing in 
the present situation that can be pointed to as likely to bring an 
early reversal of the favorable tendencies obtaining in most countries. 
The underlying and most important factor in the outlook is the slowly 
but steadily progressing recovery in world trade and purchasing power. 

More detailed information on the European cotton situation, as 
described by Mr. Steere, may be obtained from the February issue of 
"The Cotton Situation", Bureau of Agricultural Economics. 

Japanese cotton imports above last season 

Japanese cotton imports during Sept ember -January 1936-37 amounted 
to 1,788,000 bales as against 1,393,000 bales during a similar period a 
year earlier, according to information received from Agricultural Com- 
missioner Owen L. Dawson at Shanghai. The increase was due principally to 
the larger takings of Indian and Brazilian cotton. Imports of Indian cotto 
during the 5 months of the present season showed an increase of 236,000 
bales, and Brazilian 111,000 bales, while American declined 59,000 bales. 
Japanese raw cotton imports for January, amounting to 574,000 bales were 
the highest on record for January but the share of American was smaller 
than that of Indian. Imports of American, which during the first 4 months 
of the current season were equivalent to those of a year earlier, declined 
during January 80,000 bales compared with January a year earlier, where- 
as imports of Indian increased 135,000 bales. Smaller imports of American 
cotton are attributed chiefly to the price situation favoring the Indian 
product. The average January price of American Strict Middling at Osaka 
was 15.83 cents per pound and that of Indian Akola 11.31 cents per pound, 
a price spread of 28.5 percent. In both cases, prices have risen above 
those of December, but the price parity has not changed. 



March 8, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



127 



Wharf stocks of raw cotton are larger "bat they are not sufficient 
to exert any adverse influence upon the market. The heavier stocks it 
is believed are justified by the continued strong demand for piece goods. 
Stocks of Brazilian are declining rapidly and they are expected to be ex- 
hausted before cotton from the new Brazilian crop reaches Japan. 



JAPAN: 



Raw cotton imports, January 1936, with comparison: 



Growth 


January 


September-January 


1936 


1937 


1935-36 


1936-37 




Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


United States 


306,000 


225,000 


809,000 


750,000 


India 


113,000 


248 , 000 


361,000 


597,000 


Egypt 


11,000 


32,000 


77,000 


77,000 


China 


10,000 


26,000 


100,000 


110,000 


Brazil 






8,000 


119,000 


Others 


21,000 


42,000 


68 , 000 


135,000 


Total 


461,000 


574 , 000 


1,393,000 


1,788,000 



Estimates from trade sources in Japan. 

JAPAN: Wharf stocks of raw cotton, January 31, 1936, with comparisons 
(in bales of 500 pounds) 



Growth 


January 31 


December 31 


: January 31 




Bales 


Bales 


Bales 




267,000 


250,000 


348 , 000 




138,000 


103,000 


: 222 , 000 




51 , 000 


114,000 


116,000 


Total 


426,000 


467,000 


j 686,000 



Estimates from trade sources in Japan. 

OILS AND OILSEEDS 

France suspe nds impo rt quota on edible olive oil 

According to the French Journal Officiel of February 4, 1937, the 
import quota on edible olive oil is suspended up to June 30, 1937. This 
means that for the 5-month period ending June 30, 1937, there will be 
no restriction on imports of edible olive oil into France other than 
the duty v/hich for the United States is 76.40 francs per quintal (1.6 
cents per pound) . 

In recent years the annual French consumption of edible olive oil 
has amounted to about 25,000 short tons. Of this amount, about 8,000 
tons were produced in France, while the balance was practically all im- 



128 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 10 



ported fram the French possessions of Tunisia and Algeria, to which no 
quota was applied. During the current season the production of edible 
olive oil in Algeria and Tunisia, especially in the latter country, is 
said to be abnormally lovr, making it impossible for these two French 
possessions to satisfy all the olive oil requirements of France. 

The recent notice suspending the import quota on edible olive 
oil is an attempt to secure these requirements in the other olive-pro- 
ducing countries of the Mediterranean Basin. Olive oil supplies in 
those countries, however, are also much below average this season. In 
this connection it will be recalled that as a result of this year's 
small production of olive oil in Italy, the Italian Government recently 
placed a tax of 150 lira per quintal (about $3.60 per 100 pounds) on 
all olive oil exports. (See "Foreign Crops and Markets" , February 15, 
1937.) This measure, coupled with the prohibition by the Spanish insur- 
gents of exports of olive oil from the important olive-oil districts of 
Spain now under their control, will add to the scarcity of edible olive 
oil in this season's international trade. 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND NUTS 

Prospects for exports of Argentine fresh fruit to United States 

A harvest of table grapes equal to last year's good crop is in 
prospect in Argentina, according to a report from p. 0- Nyhus, Agricul- 
tural Attache at Buenos Aires. In the Province of San Juan the crop 
is smaller than last year but in the heavy producing Province of Mendoza 
the crop is as large or larger and exporte-rs are of the opinion that 
there will be fully as many grapes for export to the United States as 
last year. The principal outlets for the crop of table grapes from Men- 
doza and San Juan, apart from the domestic consumption, are the Unitsd 
States and Brazilian markets. The <rrop is somewhat earlier this year 
than last. The first shipments last year were on February 1, whereas 
this year the first shipments were made, it is reported, on January 16. 
Last year initial shipments were made to the New Orleans market, fol- 
lowing the opening of that port to the admission of Argentine grapes 
under a modification of former quarantine regulations. This year sub- 
stantially larger shipments are expected to be made to that market. 

Because of better demand conditions this year, it is believed 
that a volume similar to that of last year (553,000 boxes) will be 
absorbed by the New York market but at higher prices. Early shipments 
to the United States last year sold in the New York auctions at $2.50 
to $3.00 per box but during April, when imports were heavy, prices 
dropped to as low as $1.25 per box. To realize the same prices in 
pesos as last year, prices in the United States must be 10 percent 
higher in order to offset the appreciation in peso exchange. 



March 8, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



129 



Pear production in the irrigated Rio Negro Valley is expanding 
at a rapid rate and is expected to increase further as the trees come 
into full "bearing. About 70 percent of the export pears last year 
originated in this valley. Initial shipments of 3,765 boxes of 44 
pounds each were made to the United States in 1935. Shipments to the 
United States in 1936 totalled 14,487 boxes. A record crop is being 
harvested this year. F.o.b. prices are equivalent to about $1.50 to 
$1.60 per box, which would be equivalent to a landed duty-paid price 
in New York of about $2.60 per box. 

United Kingdom imports record quantity of C a 1 ifornia grapes 



The last shipment of California grapes, which landed in the United 



Kingdom on February 14, brought the total imports for the season to the 
record figure of 271,000 packages compared with 196,000 in 1935-36, the 
previous record ye&r, according to the T7eekly Fruit Intelligence Notes 
of the Imperial Economic Committee.. Around 159,000 packages landed at 
London and most of the remainder at Liverpool and Glasgow. The increase 
in the imports can be ascribed partly to a shortage of imports of grapes 
from Spain during the 1936-37 season. It appears, however, that the 
Emperor variety from California is becoming more popular in the United 
Kingdom as it becomes better known. 



Although pecans are not very wa^.1 known on the English market, im- 
ports from the United States increased jgreatly in 1936, as reported by 
F. A. Motz, Fruit Specialist at London^ Statistics of pecan imports in- 
to the United Kingdom are not available. Information obtained from the 
two principal firms which did most of the pecan export trade from the 
United States, however, indicates that they had sold to English importers 
7,750 hags of 50 pounds each up to the time the subsidy was withdrawn in 
July 1936. The demand for pecans in the United Kingdom has greatly in- 
creased and the reto.il turnover in 1936 exceeded all expectations. Pecans 
were sold at 1 shilling per pound (24.4 cents). 

Delivery of pecans to the English market was generally satisfac- 
tory. The quality of new-crop nuts was good, although there was little 
consistency of grade. Recently there have been some difficulties in con^ 
nection with the handling and distribution of the nuts and at the end of 
January 1937 pecans were not moving as rapidly as in previous months, al- 
though much of this was due to the holiday season having ended. There are 
"between 13 and 20 importing firms which handle nuts of various kinds, lo- 
cated principally in London and Liverpool. Several of these firms are 
handling American pecans and the tra.de is beginning to look upon these 
nuts as offering encouraging possibilities . The development of this trade 
is naturally slow to begin with and its ultimate success will require the 
maintenance of regular supplies and uniform quality at competitive prices. 



United Kingdom buys more American pecans 



130 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, ITo. 10 

Shelled al mond suppli es in t he Mediterranean Basin 



The combined 1936 production of shelled almonds in Italy, Spain, 
France, French Morocco, and Portugal is nov estimated at 64,400 short 
tons, according to a report from Agricultural Attache IT. I. Nielsen at 
Paris. This is larger than the early season forecast and represents a 
slight increase over production in 1935 of 63,500 tons. Exports so far 
this season appear to "be smaller than last year. 

No information on the Spanish almond crop has "been available since 
the outbreak of the civil war in that country, but the actual production 
is assumed to be about 25,000 tons, the July 1936 forecast. There is 
some question of course as to whether all of the almonds were gathered. 
Shelled almond production in Italy is now estimated at 33,500 tons, which 
is slightly above average. The almond crop of France was considerably 
below expectations and is not believed to have exceeded 500 tons as com- 
pared with 1,300 tons produced in 1935. Almond production in French 
Morocco was not far from average, whereas in Portugal, it was much below 
average . 

Exports of shelled almonds from Italy, Spain, French Morocco, and 
Portugal during the 4— month period, September 1 to December 31, 1936, 
amounted to 32,000 tons, or about 15 percent less than the exports during 
the corresponding period of the preceding season. Italy's exports during 
this 4-month period amounted to about 23,000 tons, which is slightly 
larger than the corresponding period in the previous season. Although 
little information regarding exports of Spanish shelled almonds is avail- 
able, it is believed that Spain exported approximately 7,000 tons from 
September 1 to December 31, 1936, which is slightly more than half the 
exports during the same period in 1935. French Morocco exported more 
than last year, whereas exports from Portugal show a drop in line with 
the smaller production in that country. 

For the remainder of the season, Italy appears to have enough 
shelled almonds on hand to supply a normal demand but not sufficient to 
fill requirements if shipments from Spain continue to be restricted. 
At present, the Spanish insurgents are not authorizing the shipment of 
almonds from the areas under their control . These include the Island 
of Majorca, which is a very important almond producer. As a result, 
and since export possibilities for Italian almonds seem to have improved, 
almond prices in Italy have increased recently and it is even said that 
some hoarding of stocks is taking place in Sicily. 

LIVESTOCK, MEATS , AMD WOOL 

France in creas es hog expo rt bounty 

A French export bounty of 2 francs per kilogram (4.22 cents per 
pound) for live hogs became effective February 17, according to the 
Paris office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. For hog carcasses 



March 8, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



131 



the bounty is placed at 2.40 francs per kilogram (5.06 cents per pound). 
The bounties represent increases over the rates of 1.20 francs and 1.50 
francs (2.35 cents and 3.16 cents per pound) established when the bounty 
law became effective December 3, 1936. 

British wool markets continue firm 

Prices at the London wool sales which opened on March 2 retained 
the levels established for most descriptions at the close of the pre- 
ceding series on January 27. Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor at London 
reports that merinos were especially firm, and were supported by opening 
prices on March 1 at Sydney, Australia, where the February 25 values were 
fully maintained. At London, scoured New Zealand ccrossbreds also were 
firm to 5 percent higher than at the previous close, although greasy 
crossbreds generally and slipes were at par to 5 percent lower. York- 
shire was the chief buyer at the London sales, with some buying on ac- 
count of France, the Netherlands, and Belgium. There were no American 
inquiries. At Sydney,' the continental countries were the chief buyers, 
with good demand also coming from Yorkshire and America on the best wool. 
Japan bought moderately. 



WHEAT, INCLUDING- FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries 
as given by current trade sour ces, 195 4-55 to 1956-37 

Country 



; Total 


Shipments 1957 


; Shipments 


• shipments 


! wee 


ik ended_ 




jJuly 1 - 


- Feb. 27 


;1954-35 


1935-36 


'Feb. 13 


Fub". 20 


Feb. 27 


'■1955-56 


•1956-57 


• 1,000 


; 1,000 


1,000 


' 1,000 


; 1,000 


: 1,000 


| 1,000 


•bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


'bu shels 


' bushels. 


bushels 


1162,832 


219,688 


3,072 


1,886 


2,896 


152,928 


170,788 


:i7o,059 


246,199 


654 


560 


218 


185,265 


161,562 


' 21,532 


15,930 


132 


235 


179 


4,952 


6,091 


: 185,228 


77,384 


7,024 


7,882 


8,854 


59,472 


91, 792 


1111,628 


110,060 


2,616 


2,397 


5,419 


72 , 620 


58,524 


: 1 , 672 


30,224; 


0 


0 


0 


27,000 


88 


| 4,104 


8,216* 


624 


296 


232 


7,880 


46,664 


:c/2,318 


c/ 2 ,529 


0 


0 


0 


255 


7,784 


1468,782 


448,101 








500,156 


575, 640 












tl 


tl 


"387, 752 


355,032 : 


11,568 | 






220, 992 ; 


281,456 












il : 


tl 


147,938 


135,528 j 


2, 648 ' 






80 , 624 j 


85 , 200 



North America a/. 
Canada , 

4 markets b/ . . . 
United States c/. 

Argentina 

Australia 

Russia 

Danube and 

Bulgaria d/ . . . . 
British India. . . . 

Total e/ 

Total European 

shipments a/. . . 
Total ex-European 

shipments a/. . . 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ Broomhall's Corn Trade News, 
b/ Form William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and New Westministe 
c/ Official, d/ Black Sea shipments only, e/ Total of trade figures in- 
cludes North America as reported by Broomhall. fj To February 13. 



132 



^oreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, Ho. 10 



'WHEAT: Closing Saturday prices of May futures 



Date 


Chic 


;ago 


Kansas 


s City 


Minneapolis ; 


■Winnipeg a/ 


; Live re 


)oql a./ 


/ Buenos 
Aires b/ 


1936 


1937 


1956 


_1937 


1936 


1937 : 


1936 


1937 


' 1936 


1937 


1936 : 1937 




Cents 


; Cents 


Cents 


s Cents 


, Cents 


f Cents 


Cents 


Cert 


% Cents 


Cents 


1 Cents' Cents 


High c/.. 


103 


138 


102 


130 


112 


144'; 


89 


130 


96 


133 


&/ 94 :d/l01 


Lot; c / . . . 


97 


126 


94 


120 


107' 


132; 


83 


118 


89 


119 


&/ 91 ;d/ 94 


Feb . 6 . . . 


99 


134 


96 


127 


109 


14 o; 


86 


129 


91 


128 


93 ; ' 99 


13.. . 


98 


138 


96 


130 


108 


144: 


85 


130 


91 


129 


92 i 101 


20. . . 


99 


133 


97 


124 


108 


140; 


84 


126 


90 


124 


91 1 100 


27. . . 


100 


132 


98 


123 i 


109 


138; 


84- 


125, 


90 


125 


91 ; 101 



a/ conversions at noon buying rate of exchange, b/ Prices are ■ 
other prices, cj January 1 to date, &/ March and May futures. 



day previous to 



WHEAT: Weekly weighted average cash price at stated markets 





AH classes 


Ho' 


p 


Ho . 


1 


Ho. 2 


Hard 


Ho . 


2 


Western 


Week 


and grades 


Hard Winter 


Dk.H. 


Spring Amber Durum 


I Red Winter 


; White 


ended 


six markets 


Kansas City 


Minnee 


.polis 


Minneapoli s 


St. Louis 


Seati 


-,le aj 




1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


] 937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 




Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s . 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


High b/ • . 


108 " 


150 


1.18 


144 


~135 


176 ; 


123 


202 


111 


145 


90 


117 


Low b / . . . 


105 


135 


107 


133 


126 


156 ; 


115 


158 


106 


137 


85 


110 


Feb. 6.. 


108 


137 


110 


136 


134 




123 




107 


140 


87 


112 


13.. 


106 


142 


107 


144 


135 : 


162 j 


122 ' 


202 


108 


145 


86 


117 


20. . 


106 


140 


111 


138 . 


132 ; 


165 j 




178 


108 


143 


85 


116 


27. . 


107 


135 


113 


133 


126 ; 


156 ! 


118 


158 . 


111 


139 


87 





b/ January 1 to date. 

WHEAT: Price per bushel at specified European markets, 1935-36 and 1936-37 



Year 
beginning 
July 




Rotterdam 






. itngiancL 


Range 


H 
Wl 


ard 
nter 


: Manitoba 
; Ho . 3 


Argentina 


Australia 

: k/ 


Berlin 
' oj 


: Paris 


and 
Wales 




Ho . 2 




Domestic 






Cent? 


C 


en b b 


■ Can t s 


Cents 


Certs 


Cep 1 3 


: Cents 


Cents 


1935-36 d/ 


High 




103 


: 104 


98 


98 




:. 165 


86 




Low 




74 


: 82 


63 


71 


209 


: 121 


59 


1935-37 d/ 


High 




132 


: 152 


128 


142 


233 


1 204 


130 




Low 




101 


: 99 


99 


100 


209 


j 179 


91 


Jan . 7 . . . 




ej 


132 


; 149 


128 


142 


223 




128 


14.; 4 




e/ 


129 


\ 152 : 


126 


139 


223 




130 


21. . . 




e/ 


123 


; 144 ! 


120 


135 


223 




130 


28 ... ' 




ej 


119- 


^ 140 j 


115 j 


130 


223 




127 


Feb . 5 . . . 


















121 


12. . . 




ej 


125 


: 147 1 


120 : 


133 


o.oO 




118 


Prices a,t Paris e 




of c 


ay pre vioi 


is to -c'thsr prices. 


Prices in 


England and Wales 



are for week ending Saturday. Conversions made ait current exchange rates. 

a/ Bar-as so . b/l'-A.Q,. ^/producer's fixed price from August 16, 1934. d/ July 

1 to date. eyHominal. 



March 8, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



133 



FEED GRAINS AND RYE: Weekly average price per bushel of corn, rye, 
oats, and barley at leading markets a/ 









Corn 






Rye 


Oats 


Barley 


We ek . 


: Chicago 


; Buenos Aires: 


Minneapoli s 


Chicago 


Minneapoli s 


ended 


1 No. 3 
• . Yellow 


Futures 


Futures ; 


No 


. 2 


No. 3 
White 


No. 2 




1936 


1937 


1936 


i 1937 


1936 


1937 ; 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


193 6 


1937 


High b/ 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s- 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


62 


113 


61 


111 


39 


56 : 


58 


117 


31 


55 


74 


137 


Low b7 


60 


108 


60. 
May 


105 

May 


38 
Mar . 


50 i 
Mar . : 


53 


106 


30 


49 


58 


127 


Jan. 30 


60 


113 


60 


108 


38 


52 • 


55 


111 


30 


52 


68 


131 


Feb. 6 


61 


111 


61 • 


107 \ 


38 


53 | 


58 


113 


30 


53 


66 


134 


13 


61 


113 


61 


110 j 


38 


56 j 


57 


117 


30 


54 


63 


137 


20 


62 


111 


61 


108 j 


38 


55 ; 


56 


113 


31 


52 


58 


133 


27 - 


61 


109 


61 


106 i 


38 


53 : 


56 


106 : 


30 


49 


74 


127 



a/ Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 
averages of daily quotations, b/ For period January 1 to latest date shown. 



FEED GRAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity 
and 
country 


Exports 
for year 


. Shipments 1937, 
i week ended a/ 


Exports as far 
as reported 


1934-35 


j 1935-36 


Feb. 13 


•Feb. 20 


.Feb. 27 


i July 1 
to 


1935-36 

i b/ 


• 1936-37 

i w 


BARLEY, EXPORTS: c/ 
United States. . . 

Danube & U.S.S.R 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


• 1,000 

• bushel s 


; 1 , 000 
: bushels 


Feb. 27 
Jan. 31 
Feb. 13 
Feb. 27 


; 1,000 

' bushels 


j 1,000. 
' bushels 


4,050 
14 , 453 

20,739 
. 11,250 


9,886 
6,882 

9,468 
37,375 


0 

704 
602 


.0 
41 


: 0 
132 


' 7 , 508 
4,416 
3,533 
39,516 


3,938 
16,436 

8,229 
22,881 


50,492 


63,611 










54,373 


51,484 


OATS, EXPORTS: c/ 
United States. . 

Danube & U.S.S.R 


1,147 
17,407 
43,753 
. 8,444 


1,429 
14,892 
9,790 
2,847 


0 

917 

0 


0 

421 

0 


0 

999 

0 


Feb. 27 
Jan. 21 
Feb. 20 
Feb. 20 


631 
10,392 
7,210 
1,390 


447 
8,048 
13 , 334 
810 


70,751 


28, 958 










19,623 


22,639 


CORN, EXPORTS: d/ 
United States. . . 
Danube & U.S.S.R 

South Africa ... 

Total 

United States 


880 
. 14,939 
256 , 143 
21,882 


885 
14,984 
307,638 
8,910 


7 

782 
7,536 
25 


0 

901 
. 8 , 500 

0 


6 

595 
7,945 
25 


Nov.l to 
Feb. 20 
Feb. 20 
Feb. 20 
Feb. 20 


99; 
3,075 
100,583 
5 , 254 


90 
9, 659 
145 , 609 
2,447 


293,844 


332,417 










109,011' 


157,805 


41,141 


24,52l| 








Dec. 31- 


3,743; 


10, 693 



Compiled from official and trade sources, "a/ The weeks shewn in these columns are 
nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary. c/ Year beginning July 1. d/ Year 
beginning November 1. 



134 Foreign Croios and Markets Vol. 34, Ho. 10 



Inde: 
Page 



Late- cables 123 : s 

Almonds, supplies, Llediterrancan : : 

Basin, 1936-37 130 : : 

Barley, situation (malting), :: 

England, 1936-37 125 : : 

Corn; ■ • 

Crop condition, Argentina, : : 

February 1937.... 124 :: 

Production, Argentina, : : 

1935, 1936 124 ; : 

Co tton; : ; 

Imports, Japan, i : 

Seot. -Jon. 1936-37 126 : : 

Stocks, Japan, : : 

January 1936,1937 127 : : 

Textile situation, Europe, : : 

January 1937 126 : s 

Fruit (fresh), export prospects, :: 

Argentina, 1937 123 :: 

Grains (feed) : : : 

Movement, principal countries, : : 

Feb. 27," 1937.'. 133 s ; 

Prices, orincipal narkots*. : : 

Feb. 27, 1937 133 :: 



Page 



Grapes, imports of Calif ornian, 

IT. K. , 1936-37 129 

Hogs, export bounty, France, 

Feb. 17, 1937 130 

Olive oil, import quota removal, 

France, Feb. -June 1937 127 

Pecans, market for American, 

England, 1936-37 129 

Rye: 



Prices, U. S. , Fob. 13, 1937.... 133 

Production, Italy, 1936,1937 124 

Wheat : 
Area: 

Czechoslovakia (winter), 1937. 125 



India, 1936, 1937 124 

Italy, 1937 124 

Export s , Cz e cho si o v aki a, 

1935,1936 125 

Prices, specified markets, 

Feb. 27, 1937 132 

Production, Italy, 1936,1937 124 

Shipments, orincipal countrins, 

Feb. 27, 1937./. 131 

w'ool, sales, London, 

March 2 and 5, 1937 123,131